My First Book of Sign by Pamela J. Baker

By Pamela J. Baker

Photographs of kids show the forming in signal language of one hundred fifty simple alphabetically prepared phrases, observed through illustrations of the phrases themselves. contains a dialogue of fingerspelling and normal ideas for signing.

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Sample text

Fingerspelling is done with whichever hand you normally use as a right-handed or left-handed person. Your palm faces out (that is, away from your body) except for the letters g and h where your palm and extended fingers point toward the center. Hold your hand in front of your chest or in front of the area between your shoulder and mouth. The position of your hand should be what is most comfortable for you but close enough to your mouth so that your mouth and hand are visible together. Say the word, not the individual letters, as you fingerspell.

The exception is in words that contain double letters. For most, form the first of the double letters. Then while holding the shape of the letter, move your hand from the center slightly to the side with a small bounce. In words with double letters made with a closed handshape (for example, o, s, and t), open your hand slightly between the two letters. Signing Right-handed versus left-handed signers The illustrations in this book show all righthanded signers, and the directions refer to the right hand and the left hand.

Also, many of the fingerspelled letters are used as handshapes in making signs. Fingerspelling is done with whichever hand you normally use as a right-handed or left-handed person. Your palm faces out (that is, away from your body) except for the letters g and h where your palm and extended fingers point toward the center. Hold your hand in front of your chest or in front of the area between your shoulder and mouth. The position of your hand should be what is most comfortable for you but close enough to your mouth so that your mouth and hand are visible together.

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